Thai Crab Curry – Gaeng Poo

  • Time to add the coconut milk
  • They decide to crack the claws so it will be easier to eat once served
  • The main ingredients are coconut milk, sugar cane, fish sauce, kaffir lime leaves and curry paste
  • The first crab to get cleaned
  • The final moment is here, and the curry is delicious!!
  • The crab curry is near completion
  • Sizzling nicely in the wok
  • Preparing the crab is the most important part
  • Lovely colours in this crab curry
  • Lovely colours in this crab curry
  • It only needs to be stirred once
  • Diluting the curry paste into the hot coconut milk
  • And in goes the crab
  • To my right Khun Cha, to my left Alis

To my right Khun Cha, to my left Alis

Here we are still in Klong Muang, southern Thailand, and we are meeting up again with Khun Cha as she has promised to cook her specialty for us: Crab Curry, or Gaeng Poo in the Thai language. Of course, there are several Thai dishes that use crab as the main ingredient, but locals will tell you that no-one should neglect to include crab on the list of must-eat food in southern Thailand.

Our morning boat trip with the crab-catching family is finally paying off as it is the time for us to watch as Khun Cha, assisted by Alis, cooks the freshly-caught crabs collected.

CRAB CURRY RECIPE

Preparation time: 10 minutes  –   Cooking time: 10 minutes

INGREDIENTS 

The main ingredients are coconut milk, sugar cane, fish sauce, kaffir lime leaves and curry paste

Serves 4 people

  • 300g vermicelli rice noodles (khanom jeen)
  • 300ml/2 cups of coconut milk
  • 2 tablespoons of yellow curry paste
  • shrimp paste  to taste
  • 1kg fresh crabs
  • 1-2 tablespoons fish sauce
  • 2 cubes of palm sugar
  • few leaves of Kaffir Lime

METHOD

Time to add the coconut milk

Step 1 – Place a pot of water to boil and then cook the noodles (khanom jeen) until pliable and soft – around 5 minutes. Drain in a colander and set aside.

Step 2 – In the same pot, add the coconut milk and lower the heat until it boils and reduces to half. Add the curry paste and shrimp paste into the coconut milk and stir and press down until all the shrimp paste has dissolved. Season with fish sauce and sugar to taste (it depends on how salty or sweet you want it) and stir until the sugar is dissolved. Add the crab meat and a few leaves of Kaffir lime, and lower the heat. Once the crab is done, transfer the curry to a serving bowl and serve it with the noodles (or with rice).

It only needs to be stirred once

Bear in mind this is a dish quite uncommon on many Thai restaurant menus. A Crab Curry, or Gaeng Poo, is basically mostly a yellow curry – the colour originating from turmeric – made with crab meat. It is typically served with fine rice noodles (khanom jeen) and vegetables, though you can use rice instead.

The final moment is here, and the curry is delicious!!

You can easily buy pre-cooked crab meat, in which case the preparation is next to nothing and the whole dish can be cooked in 20 minutes. If you, like us, use whole crabs then the time taken is a bit longer, but the pleasure of eating it will be more intense.

Crab Curry, or Gaeng Poo, is indeed one of those amazing Thai curries that you need to have on hand. Thanks again Khun Cha for this fantastic treat. 

Thanks again to all our sponsors and in particular to tour agent Fantasia Asia – The team support was amazing as usual.

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About the author

Thomas has a university background in the UK and in Latin America, with studies in Languages and Humanities, Culture, Literature and Economics. He started his Asian experience as a publisher in Krabi in 2005. Thomas has been editing local newspapers and magazines in England, Spain and Thailand for more then fifteen years. He is currently working on several projects in Thailand and abroad. Apart from Thailand, Thomas has lived in Italy, England, Venezuela, Cuba, Spain and Bali. He spends most of his time in Asia. During the years Thomas has developed a great understanding of several Asian cultures and people. He is also working freelance, writing short travel stories and articles for travel magazines. Follow Thomas on www.asianitinerary.com

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